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. chairman and ceo, rupert murdoch, testified before a parliamentary committee on tuesday. he was joined by his son, james. the hearing covers their knowledge of phone hacking and alleging payments made to police officers. they are also questioned about tampering that with the voice mail of a murdered individual. this is two hours and 40 minutes. >> we would hope that it is not the case -- excuse me, can we not have that, please? >> thank you, mr. chairman. >> could we please? [inaudible] >> anyone else? >> [laughter] >> after that brief interruption, we will begin. good afternoon, everyone. this is a special meeting of the committee, developed in 2009, where we took evidence to the extent of what had taken place at "the news of the world." [inaudible] had been involved. new evidence may have vindicated the conclusion, [unintelligible] the parliament has been misled. there is an ongoing police investigation. this committee would not wish to defend that vote, however we are encouraged by the statements made this afternoon, in which the committee will help us to establish the truth. i welc
for us. >> mr. rupert murdoch, have you considered suing harbottle & lewis? you said in the past -- in one of your first answers to my colleague, tom watson -- that you relied on the investigation by the police, the investigation by the press complaints commission, and the investigation undertaken by your solicitors, harbottle & lewis, under whose care this enormous pile of documents was found. there is an old saying, that if you want something doing, you should do it yourself. in this case, you relied on three sets of people, all of whose investigations were severely lacking. have you considered suing harbottle & lewis? >> any future legal claims or actions in any matter are a matter for the future. really, today, this is about how we actually make sure that these things don't happen again. i won't comment or speculate on any future legal matters. >> ok. the file of evidence, you were asked by my colleague, mr. farrelly, whether you had read it yourself and you said no. in the circumstances, where you have rely on other people and advisers and they have severely let your company
and comments on "washington journal." after that," newsmakers." then rupert murdoch's testimony before a parliament committee. >> what would that have been like to have met these people when you did not know the ending? >>eric larsen follows adolf hitler and the third reich. >> i started looking for characters of whose -- through whose eyes i could tell that story. that's when i stumbled upon william e. dodd. >> this story of politics and intrigue in nazi germany tonight on "q &a." ." >> this morning, a political roundtable. roundtable.
to release this information. >> amy, i suspect under the criteria, perhaps rupert murdoch is the most widely published person on earth. in some ways, things are very easy for us and very easy for me. we made a promise to sources that if they give of material that is of a certain type that is significant -- diplomatic, ethical, or historical significance, not published or under some sort of threat, we will publish it. that actually is enough. of course, we have a goal with publishing material in general. it has been my long-term believe that obverse what advances us as a civilization -- it has been my long-term believe that what advances us as a civilization is our understanding about what we're going through, what human institutions are actually like and how they actually behave, and if we are to make rational policy decisions insofar as any decision can be rational, then we have to have information drawn from the real world and a description of the real world. at the moment, we are severely lacking in the information from the interior of the secretive organizations that have such a role in
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4